REVIEW 393: X-MEN: APOCALYPSE

Release date:
May 20, 2016
Director:
Bryan Singer
Cast:

Language:
James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Oscar Isaac, Nicholas Hoult, Sophie Turner, Rose Byrne, Tye Sheridan, Olivia Munn, Evan Peters
English

The first hour of X-Men: Apocalypse holds out the promise of fun, if nothing else, of the kind we have had with the best films of the series so far. It is filled with self-deprecating humour and pathos, rich in reminders that superhuman abilities are a double-edged sword for those on whom they are bestowed.
The central antagonist, En Sabah Nur / Apocalypse, has the ability to embed his enemies in walls and reduce human beings to dust. His first encounter with people here is as wolf-whistle-worthy as the introduction of a villain in a superhero flick ought to be.
A continent away, the tour of Magneto’s personal life is poignant and beautifully shot, even if not terribly original. And across the Atlantic, sparks fly between the younger mutants.
There is much to recommend then, not counting of course the ridiculousness of an army of men and women being named X-Men, not X-People. Their christening comes at the end of the film and sounds even more jarring here than it usually does because the task of announcing the name to the troops has been sneakily given to a female character – it seems like a strategic directorial and/or writing decision to silence feminists, but ends up highlighting the series’ innate sexism.
The downslide begins well before that point though.
The second half of X-Men: Apocalypse is a damp squib in comparison with the first hour. In terms of storytelling and SFX gimmicks, it feels as if once they allow us into En Sabah Nur’s bag of tricks, Magneto’s home and heart, Team Apocalypse does not know quite what to do with either of them. And so, while the rest of the X-People… note: yeah, that’s what they will be collectively called henceforth on this blog, except in the film’s title… As I was saying, while the rest of the X-People zip around the world, the pace slackens each time Nur and Magneto get more than a few moments on screen.
This of course is disappointing considering that Magneto – a sometimes-bad-sometimes-not mutant with the ability to generate and manipulate powerful magnetic fields – is played by the charismatic Michael Fassbender who reminds us in those well-handled opening scenes that he has so much to offer as an actor. It is almost scandalous that he is wasted thereafter.
The fizzling out of the fizz in Apocalypse is particularly surprising since it marks the return to the franchise of director Bryan Singer whose X-Men (2000) and X2: X-Men United (2003) have been the best of the lot so far. Perhaps his over-rated X-Men: Days of Future Past was a sign. Apocalypse is the ninth in the series and Singer’s fourth. It is the least interesting instalment.
The story initially takes us between Egypt and the US in the 1980s. In Cairo, Nur (Oscar Isaac) rises from a long deep sleep, while in Westchester County, New York, the telepathic paraplegic Professor Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) runs his school for the specially gifted a.k.a. mutants. Xavier remains a pacifist who is keen to bring Magneto to the good side, but Magneto’s bitterness and grief make him a prime target for Nur’s fear-mongering and human-bashing.
Nur believes that humanity was lost during his centuries-long absence, while he lay entombed alive by his enemies from his previous avatar. He now wants to re-shape the earth to suit his worldview, which sounds grand, though to be honest the details are more like wannabe mumbo-jumbo. Nur is not merely a megalomaniac who believes he is God. He is God. To set the world right, he must find four lieutenants (the Four Horsemen, a reference drawn from the last book of the Bible, The Apocalypse of St John The Apostle a.k.a. The Book of Revelation). While the sub-plots via which he locates them are entertaining enough, at least two of them turn out to be such lacklustre creatures that you have to wonder why he bothered with them at all.
The four are: Psylocke, Storm, Angel and Magneto himself. Psylocke’s energy blade and actress Olivia Munn’s swagger have potential, but she can do little in the face of the sketchy writing and her colleagues’ lifelessness. Their dullness is the starting point of the film’s undoing.

Storm’s ability to control weather is as fascinating a superpower as any, yet the characterisation of this mutant has been consistently insipid throughout the series. Watching Alexandra Shipp at work in a role earlier played by Halle Berry is all the evidence you need to know it is not Berry’s fault alone that Storm has been such a bore in all the films so far. It’s the writing, stupid!
The mutants ranged against them (some are younger versions of seniors seen in earlier films) are certainly a more appealing lot, though the film is so over-populated that only three truly stand out: Evan Peters playing Peter Maximoff / Quicksilver who can move faster than time, Tye Sheridan as Scott Summers / Cyclops from whose eyes pour out destructive beams of fire and Sophie Turner (Sansa Stark from Game of Thrones) as Jean Grey / Phoenix who struggles to control her telekinetic powers. For the record, Peters is way more memorable as Quicksilver than Aaron Taylor-Johnson as the same character in last year’s Avengers: Age of Ultron(2015).
The showstopper of this film is a scene involving Quicksilver with a delightful revisitation of ’80s pop group Eurythmics’ Sweet dreams are made of this. That the idea is borrowed from a previous X-Film is forgivable since it is still so amusing. What is inexplicable though is its placement, right in the middle of an intense scene of mass destruction, like a comical interlude involving Asrani or Keshto Mukherjee during gory dishum dishum between the hero and the villain in a 1970/80s formulaic Bollywood film.  
The mutants whose potential is frittered away in the over-crowding are Nicholas Hoult as Hank McCoy / Beast, Kodi Smit-McPhee as Kurt Wagner / Nightcrawler and the always-nice-to-watch-yet-wasted-here Jennifer Lawrence playing the shape-shifting Mystique.
Perhaps the problem is that there have been too many X-Filmsalready and they have all been making so much money that the producers rushed into this one. There is certainly a great deal of mindlessness in the way X-Men: Apocalypse confuses the introduction of multiple characters for excitement. En Sabah Nur and his Four Horsemen are such anti-climactic villains. For someone who is supposed to be God, Nur seems pretty helpless in the face of the combined force of the good mutants, and at least two of his soldiers seem to look on more than join him in battle.
As criminal as the under-utilisation of Fassbender and Lawrence is the cursory treatment of themes that made the first two films so relevant: prejudice, fear of the other, a celebration of heterogeneity. Many viewers consider the X-Films a metaphor for homophobia. In a post-9/11 age, they could be seen too as a metaphor for Islamophobia. A year in which Donald Trump could well become the next President of the most powerful nation on the globe is a year crying out for a solid, well-thought-out X-Film, not this generic affair. Bryan Singer, how could you?
Rating (out of five): **1/2
CBFC Rating (India):
U/A
Running time:
MPAA Rating (US):
145 minutes
PG-13 (for sequences of violence, action and destruction, brief strong language and some suggestive images)
Release date in US:
May 27, 2016
Related article by Anna MM Vetticad: “Boys will be boys and girls will be afterthoughts: The hyper-masculine world of superhero films”
  

REVIEW 393: X-MEN: APOCALYPSE

Release date:
May 20, 2016
Director:
Bryan Singer
Cast:

Language:
James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Oscar Isaac, Nicholas Hoult, Sophie Turner, Rose Byrne, Tye Sheridan, Olivia Munn, Evan Peters
English

The first hour of X-Men: Apocalypse holds out the promise of fun, if nothing else, of the kind we have had with the best films of the series so far. It is filled with self-deprecating humour and pathos, rich in reminders that superhuman abilities are a double-edged sword for those on whom they are bestowed.
The central antagonist, En Sabah Nur / Apocalypse, has the ability to embed his enemies in walls and reduce human beings to dust. His first encounter with people here is as wolf-whistle-worthy as the introduction of a villain in a superhero flick ought to be.
A continent away, the tour of Magneto’s personal life is poignant and beautifully shot, even if not terribly original. And across the Atlantic, sparks fly between the younger mutants.
There is much to recommend then, not counting of course the ridiculousness of an army of men and women being named X-Men, not X-People. Their christening comes at the end of the film and sounds even more jarring here than it usually does because the task of announcing the name to the troops has been sneakily given to a female character – it seems like a strategic directorial and/or writing decision to silence feminists, but ends up highlighting the series’ innate sexism.
The downslide begins well before that point though.
The second half of X-Men: Apocalypse is a damp squib in comparison with the first hour. In terms of storytelling and SFX gimmicks, it feels as if once they allow us into En Sabah Nur’s bag of tricks, Magneto’s home and heart, Team Apocalypse does not know quite what to do with either of them. And so, while the rest of the X-People… note: yeah, that’s what they will be collectively called henceforth on this blog, except in the film’s title… As I was saying, while the rest of the X-People zip around the world, the pace slackens each time Nur and Magneto get more than a few moments on screen.
This of course is disappointing considering that Magneto – a sometimes-bad-sometimes-not mutant with the ability to generate and manipulate powerful magnetic fields – is played by the charismatic Michael Fassbender who reminds us in those well-handled opening scenes that he has so much to offer as an actor. It is almost scandalous that he is wasted thereafter.
The fizzling out of the fizz in Apocalypse is particularly surprising since it marks the return to the franchise of director Bryan Singer whose X-Men (2000) and X2: X-Men United (2003) have been the best of the lot so far. Perhaps his over-rated X-Men: Days of Future Past was a sign. Apocalypse is the ninth in the series and Singer’s fourth. It is the least interesting instalment.
The story initially takes us between Egypt and the US in the 1980s. In Cairo, Nur (Oscar Isaac) rises from a long deep sleep, while in Westchester County, New York, the telepathic paraplegic Professor Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) runs his school for the specially gifted a.k.a. mutants. Xavier remains a pacifist who is keen to bring Magneto to the good side, but Magneto’s bitterness and grief make him a prime target for Nur’s fear-mongering and human-bashing.
Nur believes that humanity was lost during his centuries-long absence, while he lay entombed alive by his enemies from his previous avatar. He now wants to re-shape the earth to suit his worldview, which sounds grand, though to be honest the details are more like wannabe mumbo-jumbo. Nur is not merely a megalomaniac who believes he is God. He is God. To set the world right, he must find four lieutenants (the Four Horsemen, a reference drawn from the last book of the Bible, The Apocalypse of St John The Apostle a.k.a. The Book of Revelation). While the sub-plots via which he locates them are entertaining enough, at least two of them turn out to be such lacklustre creatures that you have to wonder why he bothered with them at all.
The four are: Psylocke, Storm, Angel and Magneto himself. Psylocke’s energy blade and actress Olivia Munn’s swagger have potential, but she can do little in the face of the sketchy writing and her colleagues’ lifelessness. Their dullness is the starting point of the film’s undoing.

Storm’s ability to control weather is as fascinating a superpower as any, yet the characterisation of this mutant has been consistently insipid throughout the series. Watching Alexandra Shipp at work in a role earlier played by Halle Berry is all the evidence you need to know it is not Berry’s fault alone that Storm has been such a bore in all the films so far. It’s the writing, stupid!
The mutants ranged against them (some are younger versions of seniors seen in earlier films) are certainly a more appealing lot, though the film is so over-populated that only three truly stand out: Evan Peters playing Peter Maximoff / Quicksilver who can move faster than time, Tye Sheridan as Scott Summers / Cyclops from whose eyes pour out destructive beams of fire and Sophie Turner (Sansa Stark from Game of Thrones) as Jean Grey / Phoenix who struggles to control her telekinetic powers. For the record, Peters is way more memorable as Quicksilver than Aaron Taylor-Johnson as the same character in last year’s Avengers: Age of Ultron(2015).
The showstopper of this film is a scene involving Quicksilver with a delightful revisitation of ’80s pop group Eurythmics’ Sweet dreams are made of this. That the idea is borrowed from a previous X-Film is forgivable since it is still so amusing. What is inexplicable though is its placement, right in the middle of an intense scene of mass destruction, like a comical interlude involving Asrani or Keshto Mukherjee during gory dishum dishum between the hero and the villain in a 1970/80s formulaic Bollywood film.  
The mutants whose potential is frittered away in the over-crowding are Nicholas Hoult as Hank McCoy / Beast, Kodi Smit-McPhee as Kurt Wagner / Nightcrawler and the always-nice-to-watch-yet-wasted-here Jennifer Lawrence playing the shape-shifting Mystique.
Perhaps the problem is that there have been too many X-Filmsalready and they have all been making so much money that the producers rushed into this one. There is certainly a great deal of mindlessness in the way X-Men: Apocalypse confuses the introduction of multiple characters for excitement. En Sabah Nur and his Four Horsemen are such anti-climactic villains. For someone who is supposed to be God, Nur seems pretty helpless in the face of the combined force of the good mutants, and at least two of his soldiers seem to look on more than join him in battle.
As criminal as the under-utilisation of Fassbender and Lawrence is the cursory treatment of themes that made the first two films so relevant: prejudice, fear of the other, a celebration of heterogeneity. Many viewers consider the X-Films a metaphor for homophobia. In a post-9/11 age, they could be seen too as a metaphor for Islamophobia. A year in which Donald Trump could well become the next President of the most powerful nation on the globe is a year crying out for a solid, well-thought-out X-Film, not this generic affair. Bryan Singer, how could you?
Rating (out of five): **1/2
CBFC Rating (India):
U/A
Running time:
MPAA Rating (US):
145 minutes
PG-13 (for sequences of violence, action and destruction, brief strong language and some suggestive images)
Release date in US:
May 27, 2016
Related article by Anna MM Vetticad: “Boys will be boys and girls will be afterthoughts: The hyper-masculine world of superhero films”
  

Pranks in India 2016 | Asking Delhi Girls CHU**Ya kaise banate hain

This is our new video, the idea in this video is unique and interesting nobody made this prank before its our own creation, In This Indian prank you will see our new crew Member and we didn’t make introduction video of him because it’s boring & peoples don’t like, so watch this Chutiya kaise banate he Indian prank and don’t forget Share subscribe the channel and Like Prank in India Funny Videos. He is Paras who made this prank video in Delhi (CP), now you will see this man in many pranks and Funny videos so keep sharing Pranks in India.

Subscribe Danger Fun Club Channel for latest Pranks:
https://www.youtube.com/c/FunClubDanger

Asking Delhi Girls CHU**Ya kaise banate hain | Pranks in India 2016

SUBTITLING & DUBBING IN INDIAN CINEMA / PUBLISHED IN THE HINDU BUSINESSLINE

The Diary of a Frustrated Indian Film Buff
Hollywood has tapped India’s non-English viewers for years, but domestic industries remain half-hearted in their bid to reach viewers outside their home states
By Anna MM Vetticad

This is not so much a column as it is the diary of a frustrated, furious Indian film buff.
March 2016: I note that Marathi director Nagraj Manjule’s Sairat will be in theatres in April. The wait for his second film began the day his first – the much-acclaimed inter-caste relationship saga, Fandry – was released in 2014.
April 29: Sairat is here and as usual, booking websites and newspaper listings do not specify whether it has subtitles. I do what most viewers clearly cannot – I phone Manjule, who confirms it has English subs everywhere outside Maharashtra.
April 29 evening: I am at a PVR for another film, so I decide to book a ticket for Sairat. I am cautious as always since there have been occasions when I was informed by directors and senior multiplex chain staffers that a film was subtitled, only to find no subs when I watched it. So I double check with the booking counter executive. Sairat is not subtitled, he replies.
I tell him what the filmmaker told me. No subs, he insists. Could he ask a senior? Please? None is available, he says, adding that if a show of the film were on at that moment, he would have dashed in to verify this himself. Bizarre. He should not have to do that, I say.
Could you return tomorrow, he asks? No, I cannot spend an entire hour on another day driving all the way here and back, for information that should be on his computer right now. Time is not a joke.
I ask for a phone number I can later call. He manages to locate a senior and confirms that this hall is indeed showing a subtitled Sairat. Whew! I book, after 30 minutes wasted over this inexplicable inefficiency.
April 30: I am moved by Sairat’s inter-caste romance with its remarkably light touch despite the grim subject. I recall the previous day’s casual multiplex employee and wonder, for the nth time in my life, why it takes such an effort to be a committed viewer of films across Indian languages.
Rewind to February: Tamil director Vetri Maaran’s Visaaranai is out. I’m still drowning in my love for Kaaka Muttai, the film about two little Chennai slum dwellers that he produced last year, and I have been looking forward to this one. Again, no mention of subtitles anywhere. I am swamped with work so I avoid the rigmarole of calls to Maaran and so on.
May 8: I catch a subtitled Visaaranai at Delhi’s Habitat Film Festival. I am floored by this gut- wrenching story of police torture. It has just won the National Award for Best Tamil Film. It deserved Best Film. Sadly, most of India does not know that.
Over a decade since Holly
wood made it standard practice 
to release Hindi, Tamil and Telugu dubbed versions of all their
 big-budget, sci-fi/fantasy action adventures and thrillers simultaneously with the English originals, India’s industries are still waffling in their efforts to reach out to audiences outside their home states.
Bahubali’s well-strategised pursuit of a pan-India viewership in 2015 was unusual. S.S. Rajamouli’s film was made in Telugu and Tamil, dubbed in multiple languages and aggressively marketed across the country, not just in southern India or to Telugu expats. Result: Rs 500 crore domestic gross collections, the highest ever for an Indian film (source: forbes.com).
That said, Bahubali was inherently mass-oriented. Many makers of low-budget, niche and/or indie projects say crowds are unlikely to flock to dubbed versions of their films, and their natural viewers tend to prefer subtitles over dubbing anyway.
Fair enough, then subtitle. And if you do, let the world know you have!
May 16: Exasperated by this long-running problem, I phone Maaran to vent some steam. My questions to him apply equally to Tamil, Hindi, Telugu and India’s smaller industries.
First, is subtitling expensive? Answer: the cost of subtitling the average Tamil film is about Rs 50,000.
Not a forbidding figure, which makes you wonder why all Indian films are not subtitled outside their home territories. The clichéd response from producers is that collections beyond a film’s traditional audience are minuscule.
Most producers lack the vision to see that subtitling makes their films accessible to non- traditional audiences, which could translate into their stars becoming more familiar and thus more attractive to audiences and producers outside their home turf over time, which in turn would lead to more inter-regional exchanges of acting talent, more pan-India audiences for all Indian films and ultimately, a better spread of all languages outside states in which they are usually spoken. Unless you reach out to others, how will you reach them?
As puzzling as those who do not subtitle their films are those who do. If you made the effort, you are obviously interested in new markets. Why then would you not let the public know your film is subtitled?

“It is a simple matter of communication,” says Maaran, “but most exhibitors (theatre owners) don’t do it and distributors don’t push them since they are targeting the diaspora. Any non-diaspora audience that comes in is a bonus. What can producers do?” At least talk to them, please.
It is hard to believe that distributors have to move mountains or spend millions to convince exhibitors, e-booking sites and listings collators to merely mention that a film is subtitled. It is hard to fathom unenterprising exhibitors, since every ticket sold benefits them. And it is hard for a tormented film buff to understand why common sense does not prevail.
(This article was first published in The Hindu Businessline on May 21, 2016)
Original link:

Previous instalment of Film Fatale: Wherefore Art Thou, ‘Madrasis’?
  
Photo captions: Posters from (1) Sairat (2) Visaaranai
Photographs courtesy:

SUBTITLING & DUBBING IN INDIAN CINEMA / PUBLISHED IN THE HINDU BUSINESSLINE

The Diary of a Frustrated Indian Film Buff
Hollywood has tapped India’s non-English viewers for years, but domestic industries remain half-hearted in their bid to reach viewers outside their home states
By Anna MM Vetticad

This is not so much a column as it is the diary of a frustrated, furious Indian film buff.
March 2016: I note that Marathi director Nagraj Manjule’s Sairat will be in theatres in April. The wait for his second film began the day his first – the much-acclaimed inter-caste relationship saga, Fandry – was released in 2014.
April 29: Sairat is here and as usual, booking websites and newspaper listings do not specify whether it has subtitles. I do what most viewers clearly cannot – I phone Manjule, who confirms it has English subs everywhere outside Maharashtra.
April 29 evening: I am at a PVR for another film, so I decide to book a ticket for Sairat. I am cautious as always since there have been occasions when I was informed by directors and senior multiplex chain staffers that a film was subtitled, only to find no subs when I watched it. So I double check with the booking counter executive. Sairat is not subtitled, he replies.
I tell him what the filmmaker told me. No subs, he insists. Could he ask a senior? Please? None is available, he says, adding that if a show of the film were on at that moment, he would have dashed in to verify this himself. Bizarre. He should not have to do that, I say.
Could you return tomorrow, he asks? No, I cannot spend an entire hour on another day driving all the way here and back, for information that should be on his computer right now. Time is not a joke.
I ask for a phone number I can later call. He manages to locate a senior and confirms that this hall is indeed showing a subtitled Sairat. Whew! I book, after 30 minutes wasted over this inexplicable inefficiency.
April 30: I am moved by Sairat’s inter-caste romance with its remarkably light touch despite the grim subject. I recall the previous day’s casual multiplex employee and wonder, for the nth time in my life, why it takes such an effort to be a committed viewer of films across Indian languages.
Rewind to February: Tamil director Vetri Maaran’s Visaaranai is out. I’m still drowning in my love for Kaaka Muttai, the film about two little Chennai slum dwellers that he produced last year, and I have been looking forward to this one. Again, no mention of subtitles anywhere. I am swamped with work so I avoid the rigmarole of calls to Maaran and so on.
May 8: I catch a subtitled Visaaranai at Delhi’s Habitat Film Festival. I am floored by this gut- wrenching story of police torture. It has just won the National Award for Best Tamil Film. It deserved Best Film. Sadly, most of India does not know that.
Over a decade since Holly
wood made it standard practice 
to release Hindi, Tamil and Telugu dubbed versions of all their
 big-budget, sci-fi/fantasy action adventures and thrillers simultaneously with the English originals, India’s industries are still waffling in their efforts to reach out to audiences outside their home states.
Bahubali’s well-strategised pursuit of a pan-India viewership in 2015 was unusual. S.S. Rajamouli’s film was made in Telugu and Tamil, dubbed in multiple languages and aggressively marketed across the country, not just in southern India or to Telugu expats. Result: Rs 500 crore domestic gross collections, the highest ever for an Indian film (source: forbes.com).
That said, Bahubali was inherently mass-oriented. Many makers of low-budget, niche and/or indie projects say crowds are unlikely to flock to dubbed versions of their films, and their natural viewers tend to prefer subtitles over dubbing anyway.
Fair enough, then subtitle. And if you do, let the world know you have!
May 16: Exasperated by this long-running problem, I phone Maaran to vent some steam. My questions to him apply equally to Tamil, Hindi, Telugu and India’s smaller industries.
First, is subtitling expensive? Answer: the cost of subtitling the average Tamil film is about Rs 50,000.
Not a forbidding figure, which makes you wonder why all Indian films are not subtitled outside their home territories. The clichéd response from producers is that collections beyond a film’s traditional audience are minuscule.
Most producers lack the vision to see that subtitling makes their films accessible to non- traditional audiences, which could translate into their stars becoming more familiar and thus more attractive to audiences and producers outside their home turf over time, which in turn would lead to more inter-regional exchanges of acting talent, more pan-India audiences for all Indian films and ultimately, a better spread of all languages outside states in which they are usually spoken. Unless you reach out to others, how will you reach them?
As puzzling as those who do not subtitle their films are those who do. If you made the effort, you are obviously interested in new markets. Why then would you not let the public know your film is subtitled?

“It is a simple matter of communication,” says Maaran, “but most exhibitors (theatre owners) don’t do it and distributors don’t push them since they are targeting the diaspora. Any non-diaspora audience that comes in is a bonus. What can producers do?” At least talk to them, please.
It is hard to believe that distributors have to move mountains or spend millions to convince exhibitors, e-booking sites and listings collators to merely mention that a film is subtitled. It is hard to fathom unenterprising exhibitors, since every ticket sold benefits them. And it is hard for a tormented film buff to understand why common sense does not prevail.
(This article was first published in The Hindu Businessline on May 21, 2016)
Original link:

Previous instalment of Film Fatale: Wherefore Art Thou, ‘Madrasis’?
  
Photo captions: Posters from (1) Sairat (2) Visaaranai
Photographs courtesy:

सरबजीत: बहना, ओ बहना! [2/5]

मुख्य भूमिकायें सितारों की किस्मत होती हैं, चमचमाती थाली में रख कर ड्राइंग रूम में परोस दी जाती हैं. सहायक भूमिकायें अक्सर अभिनेताओं की झोली में उनकी मेहनत का नजराना समझकर डाल दी जाती हैं. कम से कम बॉलीवुड में बॉक्स-ऑफिस के इर्द-गिर्द मंडराती रहने वाली ‘बड़ी’ फिल्मों का तो यही लब्बो-लुबाब है. ओमंग कुमार की ‘सरबजीत’ उन्ही चंद फिल्मों में से एक है.
सरबजीत [रणदीप हुडा] सालों से पाकिस्तानी जेल में हिन्दुस्तानी जासूस होने के शक़ में कैद है. बहन दलबीर कौर [ऐश्वर्याराय बच्चन] की लगातार कोशिशों का दम-ख़म देखिये कि आज सरबजीत का पूरा परिवार उस से मिलने पाकिस्तान की जेल में आया है. बीवी [रिचा चड्ढा] भर्राए गले से पूछ बैठती है, “ठीक हो?” सरबजीत [हुडा] अपनी सारी टूटती सांसें बटोर कर कहता है, “अब हूँ!” मेरे ख़याल से पूरी फिल्म का ये सबसे कामयाब, सबसे कारगर सीन है. यहाँ आपको फिल्म से शिकायतें कम रहती हैं, पर कुछ है जो अचानक आपके जेहन में बिजली की तरह कौंध गया है. सीन में मौजूद सितारे [राय बच्चन] की चकाचौंध धीमी पड़ गयी है. दोनों अभिनेताओं को [चड्ढाऔर हुडा] बहुत थोड़ा ही सही, फैलने का एक मौका मिल गया है और वे उसमें इस कदर कामयाब रहते हैं कि आप सोच में पड़ जाते हैं, आखिर क्यूँ हर ‘मैरी कॉम’को जरूरत होती है ‘प्रियंका चोपड़ा’ की?
जब ऐश्वर्या अपने चीखने-चिल्लाने के प्रतिभा-प्रदर्शन में कैमरे को लताड़ने में मशगूल रहतीं हैं, अक्सर बैकग्राउंड में रिचा चड्ढा या तो भैसें नहलाने या ढहती दीवाल की ईंटें हटाने में चुपचाप लगी रहती हैं. उन्हें पता है, उन्हें सिर्फ फिल्म चलाने के लिए शामिल नहीं किया गया है. हालाँकि ओमंग कुमार उनका भी इस्तेमाल अरिजीत सिंह के गाने पर बखूबी करते हैं, ठीक वैसे ही जैसे वो रणदीप को फिल्म के शुरुआत में ही ‘बैंड बाजा बारात’ का रणवीर सिंहबनाने में कोई कसर नहीं छोड़ते. सरबजीत की बहन के रोल में ऐश्वर्या को एक माकूल ज़मीन देने में ओमंग इतनी शिद्दत दिखाते हैं कि फिल्म में हर बूढा-बच्चा-जवान ऐश्वर्या को ‘बहनजी’ ही कह के बुलाता है. उस पर डॉयलागबाजी का आलम कुछ यूँ कि ‘ग़दर’ का सनी देओल भी तौबा कर ले!
ग़ालिब अपने एक शे’र में कहते हैं, “मुश्किलें पड़ींमुझपे इतनी कि आसां हो गयीं”. ओमंग कुमार भी ‘सरबजीत’ की कहानी में मुश्किलों को पहले तो यूँ सामने ला पटकते हैं मानो अब कुछ भी हल मुमकिन नहीं, फिर अगले ही पल उन्हें कुछ इस अंदाज़ से दुरुस्त कर देते हैं, जैसे पहले उनका कोई नाम-ओ-निशाँ ही न रहा हो. फिल्म अपने इसी लचर रवैये की वजह से अक्सर सच्चाई से परे झाँकने लगती है. सरबजीत का पाकिस्तानी जेल में लगातार अपने परिवार के साथ चिट्ठियों से जुड़े रहना, दलबीर कौर का बार-बार पाकिस्तान आना-जाना, वहाँ के लोगों को मुंहतोड़ जवाब देना; सब कुछ एक बॉलीवुड फिल्म के दायरे में बड़ी आसानी से समा जाता है.   

आखिर में, ओमंग कुमार की ‘सरबजीत’ रणदीप हुडा, रिचा चड्ढा और अपने छोटे से मजेदार रोल में दर्शन कुमार [मैरी कॉम, एनएच 10 वाले] के अच्छे अभिनय के बावजूद, ऐश्वर्या के उकता देने वाले अभिनय [???], धीमी गति और कहानी में बनावटीपन के पुट की वजह से आपके दिल तक शायद ही पहुँच पाए. [2/5]     

सरबजीत: बहना, ओ बहना! [2/5]

मुख्य भूमिकायें सितारों की किस्मत होती हैं, चमचमाती थाली में रख कर ड्राइंग रूम में परोस दी जाती हैं. सहायक भूमिकायें अक्सर अभिनेताओं की झोली में उनकी मेहनत का नजराना समझकर डाल दी जाती हैं. कम से कम बॉलीवुड में बॉक्स-ऑफिस के इर्द-गिर्द मंडराती रहने वाली ‘बड़ी’ फिल्मों का तो यही लब्बो-लुबाब है. ओमंग कुमार की ‘सरबजीत’ उन्ही चंद फिल्मों में से एक है.
सरबजीत [रणदीप हुडा] सालों से पाकिस्तानी जेल में हिन्दुस्तानी जासूस होने के शक़ में कैद है. बहन दलबीर कौर [ऐश्वर्याराय बच्चन] की लगातार कोशिशों का दम-ख़म देखिये कि आज सरबजीत का पूरा परिवार उस से मिलने पाकिस्तान की जेल में आया है. बीवी [रिचा चड्ढा] भर्राए गले से पूछ बैठती है, “ठीक हो?” सरबजीत [हुडा] अपनी सारी टूटती सांसें बटोर कर कहता है, “अब हूँ!” मेरे ख़याल से पूरी फिल्म का ये सबसे कामयाब, सबसे कारगर सीन है. यहाँ आपको फिल्म से शिकायतें कम रहती हैं, पर कुछ है जो अचानक आपके जेहन में बिजली की तरह कौंध गया है. सीन में मौजूद सितारे [राय बच्चन] की चकाचौंध धीमी पड़ गयी है. दोनों अभिनेताओं को [चड्ढाऔर हुडा] बहुत थोड़ा ही सही, फैलने का एक मौका मिल गया है और वे उसमें इस कदर कामयाब रहते हैं कि आप सोच में पड़ जाते हैं, आखिर क्यूँ हर ‘मैरी कॉम’को जरूरत होती है ‘प्रियंका चोपड़ा’ की?
जब ऐश्वर्या अपने चीखने-चिल्लाने के प्रतिभा-प्रदर्शन में कैमरे को लताड़ने में मशगूल रहतीं हैं, अक्सर बैकग्राउंड में रिचा चड्ढा या तो भैसें नहलाने या ढहती दीवाल की ईंटें हटाने में चुपचाप लगी रहती हैं. उन्हें पता है, उन्हें सिर्फ फिल्म चलाने के लिए शामिल नहीं किया गया है. हालाँकि ओमंग कुमार उनका भी इस्तेमाल अरिजीत सिंह के गाने पर बखूबी करते हैं, ठीक वैसे ही जैसे वो रणदीप को फिल्म के शुरुआत में ही ‘बैंड बाजा बारात’ का रणवीर सिंहबनाने में कोई कसर नहीं छोड़ते. सरबजीत की बहन के रोल में ऐश्वर्या को एक माकूल ज़मीन देने में ओमंग इतनी शिद्दत दिखाते हैं कि फिल्म में हर बूढा-बच्चा-जवान ऐश्वर्या को ‘बहनजी’ ही कह के बुलाता है. उस पर डॉयलागबाजी का आलम कुछ यूँ कि ‘ग़दर’ का सनी देओल भी तौबा कर ले!
ग़ालिब अपने एक शे’र में कहते हैं, “मुश्किलें पड़ींमुझपे इतनी कि आसां हो गयीं”. ओमंग कुमार भी ‘सरबजीत’ की कहानी में मुश्किलों को पहले तो यूँ सामने ला पटकते हैं मानो अब कुछ भी हल मुमकिन नहीं, फिर अगले ही पल उन्हें कुछ इस अंदाज़ से दुरुस्त कर देते हैं, जैसे पहले उनका कोई नाम-ओ-निशाँ ही न रहा हो. फिल्म अपने इसी लचर रवैये की वजह से अक्सर सच्चाई से परे झाँकने लगती है. सरबजीत का पाकिस्तानी जेल में लगातार अपने परिवार के साथ चिट्ठियों से जुड़े रहना, दलबीर कौर का बार-बार पाकिस्तान आना-जाना, वहाँ के लोगों को मुंहतोड़ जवाब देना; सब कुछ एक बॉलीवुड फिल्म के दायरे में बड़ी आसानी से समा जाता है.   

आखिर में, ओमंग कुमार की ‘सरबजीत’ रणदीप हुडा, रिचा चड्ढा और अपने छोटे से मजेदार रोल में दर्शन कुमार [मैरी कॉम, एनएच 10 वाले] के अच्छे अभिनय के बावजूद, ऐश्वर्या के उकता देने वाले अभिनय [???], धीमी गति और कहानी में बनावटीपन के पुट की वजह से आपके दिल तक शायद ही पहुँच पाए. [2/5]     

Maruthu (2016) Tamil Full DvDRip Movie Free 300MB

Maruthu (2016) Tamil Full DvDRip Movie Free 300MB
 Maruthu (2016) Tamil Full DvDRip Movie Free 300MB

Movie Info:
Directed by: Muthiah
Produced by: N.Anbuchezian
 Music By: D. Imman
Written by: Muthiah
Starring: Vishal and Sri Divya
Release dates: 20 May 2016
Language of movie: Tamil
Rating: 4.0/5

Maruthu Movie Review
Maruthu 2016 Full Movie Watch Online & Download Free,Maruthu Full Movie Download In 3gp Mp4 Hd Hq Avi 720P,MaruthuTorrent Download Maruthu is a recently relapsed Tamil movie which has been released this week only. Maruthu movie is directed by Muthiah and produced by N.Anbuchezian. The script of Maruthu movie has been written by Muthiah and the star cast of Maruthu movie includes Vishal and Sri Divya. Both of the actors of the movie have performed to their full best and have given very good performance in terms of acting and we must appreciate them for the power packed performance in the movie. Music of Maruthu movie has been given by D. Imman and music of the movie is very good and songs of the movie have magical touch to them as they are very soothing to the ears and you will move to the beats of the songs when you will listen to them. Cinematography of Maruthu movie has been done by Ravi Rajput and the movie has been edited by Salman Qureshi.
Now let’s come to the main part of the movie and which is the plot of the movie and plot of Maruthu movie revolves around Vishal and Sri Divya. Maruthu movie is getting good response from the critics and as well as from the audience as well. And for the success of Maruthu movie we must accolade the director of the movie. Maruthu is basically a thriller movie with lot of farce elements in it. Maruthu movie is a complete family entertainer and it will entertain you that I am sure about. The screenplay of Maruthu movie is brilliantly done and done in such a way that it will really excite you and the story is woven in such a way that it will keep you gripped and you will definitely enjoy the Maruthu movie.

 Screenshots: 
Maruthu (2016) Tamil Full DvDRip Movie Free 300MB

Maruthu (2016) Tamil Full DvDRip Movie Free 300MB

Maruthu (2016) Tamil Full DvDRip Movie Free 300MB

Maruthu (2016) Tamil Full DvDRip Movie Free 300MB

Maruthu 2016 Full Tamil Movie Download Links
Maruthu Torrent Download Links

Kammati Paadam 2016 Malayalam Full Movie 700Mb HD

Kammati Paadam 2016 Malayalam Full Movie 700Mb HD
Kammati Paadam 2016 Malayalam Full Movie 700Mb HD

Movie Info:
Directed by: Rajeev Ravi
Produced by: Prem Menon
 Music By: K, John P. Varkey and Vinayakan
Written by: P. Balachandran
Starring: Dulquer Salman, Vinay Forrt, Shine Tom Chacko and Vinayakan
Release dates: 20 May 2016
Language of movie: Malayalam
Rating: 4.0/5

Kammati Paadam Movie Review
Kammati paadam 2016 Full Movie Watch Online & Download Free,Kammati paadam Full Movie Download In 3gp Mp4 Hd Hq Avi 720P,Kammati paadam Torrent Download Kammati paadam is a recently released Malayalam movie which has been released this week only and let me tell you that Kammati paadam movie has been creating waves on the very first day of its release as people are going gaga over the Kammati paadam and specially youths as the Kammati paadam movie offers such a good plot and such a good storyline. Rajeev Ravi has directed the movie and he has done a remarkable job as he has put so much of efforts in the movie and because of his efforts only the movie has tasted so much of success and that too on the very first day itself. Kammati paadam movie has been produced by Prem Menon. The story of Kammati paadam movie has been written by P. Balachandran.
They both must be appreciated too for their sharp mind and intruding story they had written. The main star cast of Kammati paadam movie includes Dulquer Salman, Vinay Forrt, Shine Tom Chacko and Vinayakan. Music of Kammati paadam movie has been given by Radhan and because of him only the movie is doing well in songs department too. As the songs of the Kammati paadam movie are on top and is getting famous with each passing day. Cinematography of Kammati paadam movie has been done by Madhu Neelakantan and the screenplay has also been done very well. The screenplay is done in such a way that you won’t even feel bored for split of a second. Kammati paadam movie is edited by Ravi Rajput, Kammati paadam movie is basically a comedy movie and you will enjoy the movie and it will tickle your bones for sure. So in the end I would like to say that Kammati paadam is a complete family entertainer movie and it must be watched by all of us. So what you are waiting for?

 Screenshots:
Kammati Paadam 2016 Malayalam Full Movie 700Mb HD

Kammati Paadam 2016 Malayalam Full Movie 700Mb HD

Kammati Paadam 2016 Malayalam Full Movie 700Mb HD

Kammati Paadam 2016 Malayalam Full Movie 700Mb HD

Kammati Paadam 2016 Full Malayalam Movie Download Links
Kammati Paadam Torrent Download Links

X Men Apocalypse 2016 Hindi Dubbed Full Movie 700MB 300MB Download

X Men Apocalypse 2016 Hindi Dubbed Full Movie 700MB 300MB Download
X Men Apocalypse 2016 Hindi Dubbed Full Movie 700MB 300MB Download


Movie Info:

Directed by: Bryan Singer
Produced by: Lauren Shuler Donner, Simon Kinberg, Bryan Singer and Hutch Parker
Music By: John Ottman
Written by: Dheeraj Rattan
Starring: James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Oscar Isaac, Nicholas Hoult, Rose Byrne, Tye Sheridan and Sophie Turner
Release dates: 20 May 2016
Language of movie: Hindi Dubbed

Rating: 4.0/5

X Men Apocalypse Movie
X Men Apocalypse is a new Hollywood movie which has been recently released. X Men Apocalypse movie has been released today only i.e. on 20th may 2016. X Men Apocalypse movie has been directed by Bryan Singer and X Men Apocalypse movie has been produced by Lauren Shuler Donner, Simon Kinberg, Bryan Singer and Hutch Parker. The main star cast of X Men Apocalypse movie includes James McAvoy, Michael Fassbender, Jennifer Lawrence, Oscar Isaac, Nicholas Hoult, Rose Byrne, Tye Sheridan, Sophie Turner, Olivia Munn and Lucas Till. Here I would like to appreciate all the actors of the movie as all the actors have acted brilliantly. X Men Apocalypse movie has been written by Bryan Singer, Michael Dougherty, Dan Harris and Simon Kinberg and here I would like to appreciate the writer also as it is the writer only who is responsible for story or I would say for the brilliant story of the movie. The music of X Men Apocalypse movie has been given by John Ottman and I must say that the music of the movie is very good the movie is doing great and receiving an overwhelming response. The background score has been given by John Ottman and background scores is also very good. Cinematography of the X Men Apocalypse movie has been done by Newton Thomas Sigel and he has done a very good job I must say that.
Cinematography has been brilliant and worth praising. X Men Apocalypse movie has been edited by John Ottman and Michael Louis Hill. I would like to appreciate the director’s effort too as the direction of X Men Apocalypse movie has been awesome and there are many twists and turns in the movie. Now let’s come to the main part of the movie and which is the plot of the movie and plot of X Men Apocalypse movie revolves around a Super Human Namely Apocalypse. So in the end I would like to say that X Men Apocalypse movie has been very good and I would like to say that X Men Apocalypse is a family movie and must not be missed and I would say that do go and watch X Men Apocalypse movie for sure. 

Screenshots
X Men Apocalypse 2016 Hindi Dubbed Full Movie 700MB 300MB Download

X Men Apocalypse 2016 Hindi Dubbed Full Movie 700MB 300MB Download

X Men Apocalypse 2016 Hindi Dubbed Full Movie 700MB 300MB Download

X Men Apocalypse 2016 Hindi Dubbed Full Movie 700MB 300MB Download
X Men Apocalypse 2016 Full Hindi Dubbed Movie Download Links Download Links
 X Men Apocalypse Torrent Download Links